Mount complains a wrong fs type, bad option, or a bad superblock

If the disk space reaches a minimum, on a Linux or Unix system you would simply create a new partition of yet unallocated space. The filesystem table /etc/fstab would get a new entry like

# <file system>   <dir>             <type>     <options>                <dump> <pass>
/dev/sda5         /some/mountpoint   ext4   defaults,uid=1000,gid=1000     0     0

In that line the options uid and gid were defined to set the owner and group of all files. Unfortunately, given the above line in your fstab, the command mount will complain a wrong filesystem type, bad option or a bad superblock.

mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sda5,
       missing codepage or helper program, or other error

       In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try
       dmesg | tail or so.

The reason for this error message is that only filesystems have an attribute for ownership/groupship which do not support Linux file permissions like (v)fat. So when choosing an ext4 filesystem you mustn’t specify uid and umask. The options, backward compatible with ext3 or ext2, that can be used with ext4 are:

journal_dev, noload, data, commit, orlov, oldalloc, [no]user_xattr [no]acl, bsddf, minixdf, debug, errors, data_err, grpid, bsdgroups, nogrpid sysvgroups, resgid, resuid, sb, quota, noquota, grpquota, usrquota and [no]bh

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